EighteenAndFive

In-depth and Intelligent Views on Liverpool FC & Football in General

Fernando’s Departure Doesn’t Hinder Rejuvenated Reds

I’ve taken an extra day before writing this, just to make sure I’m not saying it with a rush of blood – but I’m not distraught that Fernando Torres has left the club.

Annoyed by his timing; yes. Annoyed by his destination; definitely.

After all the things Torres said about the team, about the club and its’ supporters, I hardly thought that he would up sticks and depart from Liverpool (by helicopter or otherwise) in this manner, with this amount of notice. Leaving mid-season is not ideal; handing in a transfer request less than a week before the window shuts is downright ridiculous.

Yes, Torres must have been upset and annoyed and frustrated over the past eighteen months or so, but then either he shouldn’t have allowed himself to be swayed by promises last summer or he should have held himself in check until the end of this season. At the very least, handing the transfer request in at the beginning of the transfer window would have given the Reds a little more time to prepare and look for his successor; but then, would we have been able to hold Chelsea to paying a full £50 million for him? The deals which went down in the end for Liverpool – one number 9 out, one number 9 in – left very little room for manoeuvring and negotiation; something which probably pushed both transfer fees up a little.

When it was announced on the official Liverpool website that he had indeed handed in a transfer request, I really did feel gutted. I had spent the whole day telling people he wouldn’t leave; I felt it was partly mind games on the part of Chelsea ahead of our match with them at the weekend.

But when all was said and done, when it became apparent that our ‘Nando was indeed going to leave the club, I realised something.

For all Torres’ statements in support of the club and fans over the years, for all his great moments in and around the opposition penalty box, for all the improvements in his game since he joined us – and make no mistake, Liverpool improved Torres greatly as a player – he was still prepared to wash his hands of the club in an instant.

I cannot do that.

I’m a Liverpool supporter, and I’m in it for life.

We welcomed Torres into our club, we helped him grow into the very fabric of the team and the city. We sang his name, we chanted for him, we bounced for him and we celebrated goals with him, 81 times.

When John Barnes left the club, I was shocked. I didn’t realise at the time, being younger as I was, that heroes would or could ever depart the club. When Robbie Fowler left the club, I was upset and frustrated. When Gerrard almost left the club, I was treading rapidly down the same path.

But not this time. The trials – and the trial – of Liverpool over the past three or four years have taught me one thing at least: after the club itself, the fans matter most. This time, I won’t let the departure of a superstar get to me mentally the way it has done in the past. Perhaps it is because we have replacements coming straight in, perhaps it is just because I’m more used to the way football works now, but I’m not distraught that Torres has left – in fact, I am increasingly looking forward to this new era of Liverpool Football Club – new forwards, new manager, new owners who are willing and able to move quickly and decisively in the transfer market.

Which brings me to the better part of this article.

Andy Carroll and Luis Suarez – Liverpool FC’s new deadly duo, or so we hope.

I don’t need to cover the ‘potential’ and ‘risks’ associated with the players, that has been covered extensively and very well in some quarters, but what I would say is that the combined efforts of the duo playing together could turn out to be rather significantly more than the sum of the parts.

Liverpool haven’t really had a forward pairing who have complemented each other on a long term basis – Gerrard and Torres perhaps had a year or so, regularly broken up by injuries and poor form – since the days of Heskey and Owen. Carroll and Suarez each have abilities which should dovetail wonderfully with the other, as well as having some key attributes in common: the ability to take on players, the knack of scoring from both inside and outside the area and, most of all, that innate and ever so important desire to win.

While Andy Carroll will certainly be more of a central reference point for Liverpool, he is capable of dropping deeper and linking play very well indeed, and can actually put in a very good cross as well. I’m already getting tired of people saying having Carroll with no wingers is pointless – for starters, name me wingers who can cross with regularity and consistency? And secondly, our new Geordie forward is as good with the ball at his feet as any ‘small’ forward in the league. Watch back the Newcastle game against Arsenal – it wasn’t just in the air that Carroll dominated the Gunners’ back line.

Luis Suarez of course will be utilised in a more fluid role, being as he is capable of playing all the way across the front line.

Looking at how they might fit in to Kenny Dalglish’s team in the early days, we might suppose that a 4:2:3:1 (or variations thereof, such as a 4:5:1 or more fluid midfield of 4:1:4:1) will be the order of the day for the remainder of the season, supposing that most players remain fit and available.

With Carroll as the top man, Meireles and Lucas would be able to continue their burgeoning partnership in the middle, with Steven Gerrard playing ahead of them through the centre. Meireles and Gerrard, as we’ve seen, can swap quite easily and either one of them can play the deeper role alongside Lucas (or Poulsen) or a more advanced central role.

On the flanks, I suspect that Maxi Rodriguez may be the early loser after these two incoming transfers; Dirk Kuyt, while out of form recently, is still an integral part of this Liverpool team and is likely to keep his spot on the right side of the attack, with Luis Suarez, Liverpool’s new number 7, slotting in on the left side, from where he will be able to make his trademark runs across the attack and cause all sorts of havoc for the opposition defence. Get him one-on-one against some ponderous centre-backs as Suarez cuts in from the left, and we will see the real tangible values of the Uruguayan in no time at all.

Should Dalglish want to slightly change the attackinging balance, a true 4:3:3 is now possible for Liverpool to attain, with Suarez and Kuyt either side of Carroll.

In terms of pure numbers, Liverpool are no better off following this transfer window. Paul Konchesky (loan to Notts Forest), Ryan Babel (£6m to Hoffenheim) and Torres (£50m to Chelsea) have all left, while the two forwards Suarez and Carroll came in. In terms of net spend, with only a £2m outlay, there should still be plenty of spending power available to the management come the end of the season.

And quality?

The loss of Torres is undeniable. He was, and presumably remains, a world class striker. But have Liverpool seen enough of that over the past eighteen months? Absolutely not. Some performances were below par this season and his usual injury problems persisted during the whole of 2010. He seemed to recovering his touch following Dalglish’s appointment and the Reds’ improved tactics, but if he didn’t want to be at the club, we were never likely to see the 2008 version of Torres return to the Anfield pitch on a regular basis.

Ryan Babel was a maverick; capable of moments of genius, but far, far too infrequently to be considered any kind of first team regular. And Paul Konchesky’s time at Liverpool never looked likely to succeed from day one.

In have come two big name, big fee players; players who will be first team regulars immediately, and both with undeniable talent. Should they manage to, as I suspect they will, bring out the best in each other – and that of Gerrard, Meireles, Glen Johnson and Kuyt in attack – then the overall benefit to the squad will be enormously greater than that which has been lost.

Torres might have left, but Liverpool Football Club are absolutely on the path upwards, fuelled with optimism and desire and a real belief that the team can become great again, sooner rather than later.

Don’t bet against them proving just that against Fernando’s new club at the weekend.

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3 responses to “Fernando’s Departure Doesn’t Hinder Rejuvenated Reds

  1. McrRed February 1, 2011 at 9:12 pm

    Brilliant…

  2. Mary February 2, 2011 at 5:13 pm

    Great article. Actually made me feel better about the whole sorry episode.

  3. Joe Mc Geer February 2, 2011 at 5:34 pm

    Great read again Karl.. Carroll and Suarez could be next Toshack n Keegan.. I know Im showing my age now…. Joe

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